picture-winged flies
#1
I found a male and female of the fly Palloptera umbellatarum in my garden Malaise trap last week - this is one of several flies in the family Pallopteridae ('Flutter Flies') in Highland. Mostly have very distinctive wing markings on their large wings and belong to a wider group called picture-winged flies. There is a handy key by Alan Stubbs here https://www.flickr.com/photos/63075200@N07/26074440117 and Steven Falk has wing photos here  https://twitter.com/stevenfalk1/status/9...09?lang=en

   
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#2
Another one to look out for now, on wild roses, also Japanese Rose, is Rhagoletis alternata. I found one in my Heath trap last night. It's one of the Tephritid flies, orange with green eyes and very distinctive wing markings - two diagonal bands across the forewing with three other marks.  The larvae inhabit rose hips. 

See https://scotland-species.nbnatlas.org/sp...0000012869 for a picture and distribution map. Lots of living pictures on Google images. The RESL Handbook for Tephritidae is on line here: file:///C:/Users/User/Documents/Keys%20f..._White.pdf
and has illustrations of wing patterns near the end - many though not all species can be recognised from these. Need to check carefully!
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#3
I found this Picture-winged fly recently up on the north coast. Is this Xyphosia miliaria? Plenty of thistles nearby but this insect chose a Hazel leaf to alight on.

Graham Crittenden        
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#4
By a coincidence I had Anomoia purmunda near Beauly today, only the second record in our database the most northerly and one of only two N of the Central Belt on the NBN map.  The other was in Inverness, 2010, found by Jimmy McKellar.  It is associated with Hawthorn, and has a unique wing-pattern as in this image.


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#5
(28-07-2020, 04:21 PM)grahamcrittenden Wrote: I found this Picture-winged fly recently up on the north coast. Is this Xyphosia miliaria? Plenty of thistles nearby but this insect chose a Hazel leaf to alight on.

Graham Crittenden
I can't see the detail of the wing, Graham, to be certain, but there are lots of X. miliaria around just now.  If you see something like this on especially Marsh Thistle just now it is likely to be this.  We have one record on the N coast but I would expect it to be under-recorded there.
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